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Clinical Research

Anyone registered with this practice could help shape the future of health care by helping with research projects that you may be invited to participate in. You may be approached by a member of this practice to participate in a research trial.

Clinical trials of new medicines are often a way of offering patients brand new, not yet available treatments for different conditions. They are an essential way of testing the effectiveness of new medicines under close supervision. These new medicines will have been under development for several years and already tried by hundreds if not thousands of patients in earlier trials, so will be proven to be safe and effective.

All of our trials are fully ethically approved, adhere to strict guidelines and are purely voluntary on the patients’ part.

We are currently looking for volunteers to take part in the following studies:

CANDID: Are you over the age of 35 with a complaint of any chest symptoms (e.g. cough, short of breath, wheeze)? Or do you have any bowel symptoms (abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhoea, feeling tired all the time)?

If so please contact the research team as this study (from Southampton University) aims to explore predictors for cancer.

HEAT: If you are 60 years old or over who are prescribed aspirin on a regular basis, we may be contacting you. This study has been set up to help prevent stomach bleeding from ulcers.

There will be more studies in diabetes and Impetigo to follow soon.

For more details or an informal chat about any of our important research studies, please contact Tina-Marie Ringrose, Clinical Research Nurse at the main surgery telephone number: 01652 650131, or email Tina at: tina-marie.ringrose@nhs.net

The links below provide further information about participating in research projects and clinical trials.

http://www.invo.org.uk

https://www.ukctg.nihr.ac.uk/

 

 

 

 



 
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